About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNNW 16
MSNBCW 12
CNBC 8
KPIX (CBS) 5
MSNBC 4
CNN 3
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 66
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
chief of staff, erskine bowles, who chaired the first deficit reduction commission. they're concerned about the dangers ahead. so concerned that simpson took to the dance floor to urge young people to get involved. we'll also get the take of rising democratic star cory booker, the mayor of newark. what's his answer to the washington gridlock? and is he planning a run for governor against chris christie. for analysis, we'll turn to joe klein of "time" magazine. "washington post" columnist michael gerson and our own norah o'donnell and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning again. well to the famous combos of modern life, from mac and cheese peanut butter and jelly rum and coke, bread and butter, and salt and pep pepper, add one more pair simpson-bowles. alan simpson may be in wyomingy and erskine bowles in north carolina but you can't mention one without think of the other. when you headed up the bipartisan deficit c
with the president and other ceo's to discuss the impending crisis. we even published their own study on the deficit, copies of which are available here today. we look forward to continuing this conversation, keeping the dialogue on going for the next month is critical if we're going to solve this problem -- and we think our panel will be very enlightening in terms of what the issues are. so, al, with that i will turn it over to you and the panel. we look forward to reproductive hour. thank you very much. >> can everybody hear? i welcome you all to bgov -- if you do not know as much about it as you want, i invite you to stay, because it really is a fabulous place. we do have an all-star panel. i will start with my left, which is where bob corker says i always start. tim pawlenty, former governor of minnesota. i wrote that i thought that if he could get the nomination he would have been the strongest republican presidential candidate. i was absolutely right -- we just could not figure out how to get there from here. tim is now the head of the financial services round table, a job he took just about a
's to discuss the impending crisis. we even published their own study on the deficit, copies of which are available here today. we look forward to continuing this conversation, keeping the dialogue on going for the next month is critical if we're going to solve this problem -- and we think our panel will be very enlightening in terms of what the issues are. so, al, with that i will turn it over to you and the panel. we look forward to a productive hour. thank you very much. >> can everybody hear? i welcome you all to bgov -- if you do not know as much about it as you want, i invite you to stay, because it really is a fabulous place. we do have an all-star panel. i will start with my left, which is where bob corker says i always start. tim pawlenty, former governor of minnesota. i wrote that i thought that if he could get the nomination he would have been the strongest republican presidential candidate. i was absolutely right -- we just could not figure out how to get there from here. tim is now the head of the financial services round table, a job he took just about a month or two ago
intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by making more cuts and the only people it is going to hurt is the working class and somewhat of the middle-class. he should mention the fact that out of control spending has a lot to do with the credit card crunch. specifically because of the middle-class. i think if we get those tax cuts centered with them, i do not think the poll would be affected. you have these small companies that are developing, and he is saying have those small companies hire more people and get them involved, but come consumer expenditures. that is partially i think a solution. host: you are calling on the republican line and you think hillary clinton would make a good candidate. would you vote for her in 2016? caller: i think she would be a very vital aspect to the political process. as far as her running for president, 2016 -- god knows what may happen from this point to that point. as far as her role as a democrat, i think by working along with
the deficit we have. the truth is, if you want to balance the budget, which i do, you have to have increased revenues and you have significant spending cuts. and you have said many times on this program that raising taxes on rich people is not enough to deal with the deficit. you are right. the truth is, the best thing we could do is go over the fiscal cliff. we have the same tax rates that we have when bill clinton was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative
they erase the trust deficit, every time they do it, they make it harder to do the big stuff. >> ken, notwithstanding the problems whef outlined in this conversation and the problems coming from washington, there is some economic renaissance going on. we've got low energy prices, manufacturing input. this housing boom with more interest rating here to stay for a couple of years. is there enough that can happen in this economy to off set what's happening? >> we can't ignore them. i wish i could say that. if they blow it, there's nothing we can do, but i think the risks are becoming more balanced where things like the housing recov recovery, consumer debt coming down are start tog offer the possibility where growth might be a little stronger. although on the other hand, the europe and many things you mentioned, all these uncertainty mentioned it could be lower. we're less vulnerable than we were, but if they don't strike a deal, i think they will, they may go over january 1st so the republicans can say taxes went up even though they give in on the tax hikes for the 2%. >> stay where yo
. >> here's the key. i don't think they can do a two-step deal unless we agree to long-term deficit reduction. the uncertainty will remain. that is in a sense, kicking the can down the road. and that is the worst outcome. >> here's what you can do. you can come up with an agreement on the big framework of an overall deal before want fiscal cliff. how big is the deal going to be? how much in revenues? how much are we going to do with entitlements and then it has to go through the committee of jurisdiction how to do tax reform right and health care right. you need to come up with a top line parent of the deal and make sure it's big enough to fix the problem. one of the concerns i have is start negotiating down and down and down and not really fix the problem and there's no impetus to finish up. >> they have to scale back the cliff, the tax increases and spending cuts. the second is the debt ceiling. and the third thing is the path to fiscal sustainability, the long-term deficit reduction, tax reform, reforms to the entitlement programs that get to us a stable g.d.p. in the future. and
who actually came up with a plan to cut the deficit, a plan that everyone hailed as magnificent but no one wanted to adopt. >>> joining me now is cnn contributor will cain. he leans right. good morning, will. >> good morning. let me tell you something. you said the popularity of gangnam style knows no limits. i beg to differ. >> you do? >> i think we just found its limits, when 8-year-olds start doing gangnam style you can count on its popularity decreasing. we're about a year away from it being makarena. >> trying to get two sides come together to come to a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> i don't know about young people's abilities to force cats and dogs and democrats and republicans to come together to find a deal. he had a much more profound message than just simply dancing in that clip, in that psa essentially. he was trying to alert young people to the fact that old people, bluntly, are organized. look at the army of aarp representatives that ensure that programs like medicare and social security, programs that take up something like 50% of our federal budget will remain intac
and supporting unspecified r revenue hikes to help cut the deficit. and big business resigned to higher taxes. here is lloyd blankfein. >> we had to lift up the marginal rate. >> norquist's response? >> some of these people have had impure thoughts. no one pulled the trigger and voted for a tax increase. >> to be sure, norquist is still raking in big bucks. according to open secrets.org, he shelled out almost $14 million to defeat democratic opponents in this past election cycle. >> we've run ads to let people know who has taken the pledge and who hasn't. we'll do phones into letting people know who is taking the pledge. >> norquist's big backers are republican operatives, cross roads gps, the super pac led by kingpin karl rove and the center to protect patient rights. closely tied to the ultra conservative cook brothers. they account for a majority of the budget and there's no sign that they're running scared. norquist truly believes that the best way to grow the economy is to tame big government. he told me recently he will be vindicated no matter how many politicians break the pledge. what
is the problem? we cannot raise taxes enough to take care of $1 trillion worth of deficit spending every single year. so let's get off of this and get on to the other side and start talking about what we have to do to cut our spending, to reform those entitlement programs that are the debt drivers and then do pro-growth tax reform that will stimulate the economy, get the money coming in. it's the best way to get money coming in and that gives everybody a job and helps to take care of the fiscal problem and balanced is what we need. >> congresswoman diane black, thank you for joining me this morning. i appreciate your time. >> thank you. >> i want to bring in our political power panel. political reporter, karen tumult, karen finney and robert trainam. karen, since i know you the best, i'm going to call you k-fin as not to confuse everyone. it seems the taxes are going to go up on the wealthy. the question is whether or not it's through the tax increases or closing the loopholes and the deductions. so do you think that we are closer to a deal today than yesterday if. >> i do. in that now they're
on the highest 2%, you cannot generate enough revenue for deficit reduction. unfortunately, the changes in the tax code, which is republicans want to turn to will increase taxes and cut tax deductions for the middle class americans. >> all right. joining me now, contributing editor for the daily beast. we just heard from democratic senator there. does that sound like any progress has been made? as we talk about 23 days, that doesn't take into account we are looking at december 21st. if you happen to watch that on television, it looks like both sides are hardening. the cement is getting thicker. there's a growing recognition on the republican side that they have lost the debate over the higher tax rates and that those rates will go up. and there are lots of other tax increases that aren't getting the public attention. the rate at which capital gains are taxed. the rate that is paid on dividend income. i'm stumbling over my words because i don't have a lot in that category. i think the republicans are willing to move there and there's money there. the president has been more forthcoming o
thought you should take a look. it totals $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction over ten years. the part that stood out to us was $600 billion in proposed savings in medicare reforms. how? in part by raising the age of eligibility to 65 to maybe 67. turning down the gop proposal, dan pfieffer said, quote, it provides no details on which deductions they would eliminate, which loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve." let's head now to the white house and dan lothian. the white house will not offer a counter proposal, right? what's going on here? >> reporter: well, you know, i think the white house is digging in. the president said early on in this process that he would only sit down and really move forward, negotiate on this in any meaningful way if the tax hikes for the wealthy expired. and republicans have been pushing back on that -- tax breaks rather for the wealthy expired and republicans have been pushing back on that, say they go believe that will be harmful for the economic recovery because wealthy americans are the ones who are creating the jobs and
that calls for $2.2 trillion in deficit savings. it includes $800 billion in tax reforms, 600 billion in medicare reforms and 600 billion in spending cuts. because it doesn't contain tax hikes for the wealthiest americans or specifics about which loopholes will be eliminated, the president immediately rejected the republican proposal. want to know how far apart democrats and republicans are? listen to this. >> i think we're going over the cliff. >> it's unfortunate the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> what we can't do is sit here trying to figure out what works for them. >> the president's idea of negotiation is roll over and do what i ask. >> it's clear to me they made a political calculation. if their ideas are different from ours, we can't guess what they are. >> they need to be more specific. >> some specificity from them. >> he can't be serious. >> haven't even begun to be serious. >> we need to get serious. >> i don't think they're serious. >> i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. >> hard to disagree with that. we're nowhere. period. >> t
revenue. as i've indicated, the only way to get the kind of revenue for a balanced deficit reduction plan is to make sure that we're also modestly increasing rates for people who can afford it. folks like me. just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. >> the concerted effort from the white house is very clear. here's white house press secretary jay carney. >> what will produce a deal is an acknowledgement by republicans, republican leaders, that rates on the top 2%, the wealthiest americans, have to rise. there is no deal without that acknowledgement, and without a concrete, mathematically sound proposal -- >> but speaker boehner still insists he can get the revenue without raising rates? >> now, the revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more of their money to the federal government without raising tax rates, which we believe will harm our economy. >> some conservatives just can't stan
trillion from the deficit saying it doesn't quote meet the test of balance. the gop said the same thing about the white house's opening salvo. the gop says the ball is now in the white house's court. where are we with the dollars here? >> reporter: we have the opening bids from speaker boehner and president obama. the different in dollars. the president wants $800 billion more in tax increases. the republicans want approximately more a trillion dollars more spending cuts. that's the difference between the two sides just in dollar terms. there is a difference between the two sides in terms of principle. the principle centers on higher tax rates, yes or no. speaker boehner many latest offer is raise $800 billion mostly from the wealthy by limiting deductions. the president says, no, don't want that. we want to tax the rich with higher tax rates on the rich. we have a dollar difference, a difference in principle. martha: we are hung up on ideology here. if you can get the money one way and it produces a long lasting change to the tax code which both sides say they want, what seems to be th
the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out of spending and tax hikes, stops the spending. mandatory spending cuts across the board. you know what? the only way to do it. only way to do it. everything else is chump change. >> dana: how do you deal with deficit reduction if you raise the taxes on a portion of the country that will pay for the government for 8.5 days? >> bob: you couple that with the social security adjustments and medicare. 'canes that is not what geithner put on the table. >> dana: that is going to be on -- >> bob: that is what is going to be on the table. >> dana: republicans held their feet on the fire. >> bob: whatever it took. >> greg: i used to think howard dean was a proctologist because he had his head up his butt but he pulled the curtain back. it's never about raising taxes on the rich because you run out of rich. >> andrea: right. >> greg: that is the point. >> eric: raise tax on everyone who pays taxes or everyone? everyone means the poor and 47% will start pa
put together a plan to move us towards some kind of deficit reduction package eventually evolved into the simpson-bowles commission plan. but the point i was making and i think the speaker is making is republicans have not come out here with some hardball, crazy off-the-table negotiation. what they have done is put something that bill clinton's former chief of staff at one time odd voe indicated for. and i think in the end that reflects that we are moving toward the potential compromise deal. >> he said -- >> i think i'm inappropriately in the middle here. i ought to be over there on the left. what bowles said yesterday was i was testifying before congress, and i described that as a midpoint between what republicans want and what democrats wanted. it was not what i would recommend. but i don't think that's even relevant. >> -- circumstances have changed since then. >> i don't even think that's relevant. i think the real question here and i think ron's right about this is are tax rates going to go up? yes, they're going to go up, because republicans are not going to have to vote f
leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgebu. the latest gop offer would overhaul the tax code, raise $800 billion in new revenue but seek $600 billion in health savings, net savings add up to about $2.2 trillion over ten years. boehner called the white house's original offer la la land and it does appear that even though at one point bowles endorsed a blueprint like this, he's trying to distance himself from it right now. >> the president got re-elected. he's claiming he got re-elected in part because he wants to tax that 2%. he cannot go back on that. in the meantime, congress most of the republicans signed the grover norquist pledge which says you cannot tax that 2% more than anybody else. you can't increase the taxes. so we're at a stalemate and someone has to give and i don't see anyone giving right now. >> bank of america today commented on the let's jump crowd. the bungee jump crowd for which they think is a scenario. >> you wonder how much of that is in negotiating position. embraced early on by senator schumer, new york
him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to really bash boehner from the right. the president needs to take note. he needs to take note. >> give him some running room. >> i'm only saying this because you remember, we went through this with newt. you know, bill clinton would push newt only so far, and then the conservatives in the caucus like myself and matt salmon, steve largent and others would say we're not doing a deal. we will take this place down. we're not doing a deal. and then newt would call bill clinton up and say, you're pushing me too far. you've got to work with me here. the same thing's happening right now with boehner. >> with boehner. >> the republican -- and when you start stripping people of committee -- committee seats, war breaks out and it gets really -- it happened with us. it's about to happen here. he's got to realize that boehner is his partner. >>
're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> meanwhile, on the other side of the aisle, republican senator marco rubio gave the weekly republican address today. part of his message? the tax rate should not go up on anyone including the top 2%. >> we must reform our complicated, uncertain, job-killing tax code by getting rid of unjustified loopholes. but our goal should be to generate new revenue by creating new taxpayers, not new taxes. >> joining me, author of "the escape artists: how obama's team fumbled the recovery." david nakamura is with us, as well, from "the washington post." good to see you. what's your read on this, first of all, both sides publicly giving the impression they are sticking to their guns? >> yeah. i think in the past week you've seen some movement in the gop, some acknow
offer a counter proposal on the fiscal cliff. their plan, $2.2 trillion deficit savings over the next decade, but it does not include higher tax rates for the wealthy. the house speaker john boehner calls it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. guess what? the white house released a statement tonight saying the plan is nothing new, that it lowers rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill. so to borrow a phrase, we're nowhere. period. david walker is president and ceo of comeback america initiative. he's made it his mission to promote fiscal responsibility. he joins us along with cnn political analyst, david gergen. the house republicans put forward their counter proposal. speaker boehner says it's credible and the white house should consider it. is it credible or is it more of what you have called the irresponsible unethical immoral behavior of all the politicians here in washington? >> i think both sides are now putting things on the table but i think they're confused. what we have to do in the short term is avoid the fiscal cl
the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. >> sometimes you hear a sound byte and it sounds like the normal talking points of the campaign that you always here, you're always hearing politicians saying the same thing. but listen again to that last thing that the president said there. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. >> speaker's proposal is out of balance. empirical statement, sort of. there's a way to judge whether or not that statement is true. what's happening in washington is both sides, republicans and democrats, are making offers and counteroffers about how to deal with the fiscal mess that they created. this artificial debt line that washington created. the white house made its offer to republicans last week. they sent timothy geithner up to capitol hill to unveil the administration's offer to congressional republicans. the offer was essentially a mix of t
shot down the theory of closing loopholes to cut the deficit saying it's exactly that. a theory. >> it is not possible for us to raise the amount of revenue that's required for a balanced package if all you're relying on is closing deductions and loopholes. it is possible to do theoretically. it is not possible or wise to do as a practical matter. >> the president then threw a left hook warning republicans who think they might be aim able to use the debt ceiling as leverage in future negotiations and saying essentially dream on. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. because we've got to break that habit before it starts. >> joining me now from the capitol dome, nbc's luke russert. i don't know, i think that was what we call officially laying the smack down over there at the business roundtable. i was really surprised that the president wen
for a couple of years about tax rates, about entitlement spending, about deficits that have topped $1 trillion throughout the obama presidency. i suspect all of them eventually are going to get settled but they aren't going to get settled at the same time, including the debt limit increase. >> john harwood, thank you. >>> let's see where we do stand on the fiscal cliff deal. let's look at our "rise above" meter. time to stop talking and start actle. we were at a half-way point, now back to a quarter on the "rise above" meter, closing to no deal than deal. >>> lawmakers trying to solve the fiscal cliff issue. police trying to solve a burglary at the home of california congressman darrel issa. according to reports, more than 50 pieces of jewelry worth about $100,000 were stolen from the congressman's home on november 29th. watches, earrings, rings, bracelets involved and what issa spokesperson calls irreplaceable family air looms. >>> to the jobs report today. super storm sandy slammed the east coast but it looks like it didn't have all that much impact on the labor market. november jobs numbers
-term deficits and we should do ethics help growth in the short term like rebuilding american infrastructure, helping americans with their mortgages, extend unemployment benefits. we show a way to pay for those in our plan in that context. that's what we think makes the most sense. of course, we're open to suggestions. there are going to be other ideas from democrats, other ideas from republicans. we can take a look at those ideas and evaluate them but not until we see them. >> schieffer: bottom line, though, is you're going to-- you're going to have to have more revenue and you expect to get it from upper income americans. you think they ought to pay more. >> we're going to have higher rate and higher revenue interest just 2% of americans. in any event% of americans do not need to see and are not going to see an increase in their marginal tax rates. that's a commitment of president. i think we're going to get there. the republicans have conceded-- and this is important-- they're prepared to raise revenue, raise taxes as part the deser deal but they haven't told us how far they're willing to
. deficit reduction plan how to get it back on track. they are proposing the plan that is a democrat version of the -- democrat counterpart to simpson. very smart. this offer was serious. the white house even though they put out a statement saying blah, blah, not good enough. call it a republican letter -- >> eric: this is the republican letter does not meet the test of balance. said our way or the highway from the white house. >> bob: reform ideas are interesting and should be on the table. the rest is bull. they don't cut anything out of defense. number one. number two, talk about the tax reform that will get to rich. or broaden the base of the tax base. including more people paying taxes. this is a joke on top of joke, andly give you this. entitle reform are good ideas. calling the -- >> dana: i thought bush tax cuts only help the rich. i defended that for eight years. >> eric: get greg in here. bob calls this a joke of a joke. republicans suggest $600 billion in more taxes. >> yeah. >> dana: $800 billion. >> eric: sorry. $800 billion. the white house plan is no spending cuts. >> greg: ob
which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republicans want to close tax loopholes and eliminate deductions, which they say will raise $800 billion in new revenue. >> the president has a huge responsibility to work together with congress and find a solution to avert the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: and they say it's now up to the president to find a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. so now that each side has rejected the other's first offer, it's going to be interesting and important to watch the timing of the next offer on the part of the white house t
are the one that is are going to be handed down the $16 trillion deficit. it is hard for this to play out. they will come to some sort of a deal. you are going to see them come to a deal. you are going to see them with something sort of like the simpson bowles. >> pam has sent it to the public. that if it goes over the fiscal cliff republicans are prepared to make the middle class pay more tax paying more. and that is a very bad position for the republicans to find themselves in isn't it? >> sit a very bad position for them to find themselves in. the fact of the matter is, it isn't true. the taxes on the wealthiest americans, it doesn't address the core problems. the $16 trillion comes from government over spending and we have slow growth. raising the taxes on anybody whether it is on the poor or the other americans doesn't solve the problem. let's get in and figure out what the key problems are and solve those. i made an analogy earlier to giving a kid more allowance. i stopped paying them. >> i mean un believable. so kate, middleton, is in hospital with this morning sickness and reveale
is a deficit hawk. liberal, but he is a deficit hawk. he doesn't say maybe if we can't get a deal together, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceiling fight right afterwards. it's not like that's six months down the line. that's in if first month, six weeks of the new year. >> the other thing, depending on where you stand, the idea that we just get rid
% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ ♪
we have here, the real driver of budget deficits, the real threat to american economics, superiority in this world, out of control-- the president of the united states, the president for four yea years, no credible plan for tackling that spending. >> dave: there's been nothing put on paper when it comes to entitlements from the president one thing he's been afraid to do. now he's been reelected don't be afraid to face the voters. tack tackle entitlement and changes to survive. >> alisyn: isn't that the beauty of the second term. incumbency you're no longer bo ho holden to anyone. >> and that 1.6 trillion dollar. before 800 billion and now it's 1.6 trillion. maybe that's the second term speaking. >> alisyn: let's talk about what's going on with the christmas tree. as you know, it's christmas season and that means that there will be incidents where the p.c. police are out in force, checking and calling your tree, a holiday tree or a christmas tree and this has. this is brewing in massachusetts because the mayor of a small town, well, a city in massachusetts, a small river had invited r
to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious negotiations. i don't think the republicans want to fight to the death to protect tax breaks for the
taxes should be raised on wealthy americans to help reduce the deficit. latest version of the plan would prevent a tax hike on the first quarter million dollars of a person's earning. >> the wealthiest americans would get a tax cut on first $250,000 and families everywhere would enjoy peace of mind. senate has done their part. we're waiting for republicans and so far they have put unballoted plan that lowers rates for the wealthy americans. >> marco rubio says it will not reduce the nation's $16 trillion debt. >> officials for the proposed sonoma marin smart train are looking to get federal funding to buy more train cars. smart train is committed to go to cloverdale and larkspur but more rail cars would be needed. they report that money force the cars would come out of the budget for pedestrian and bicycle paths. bicycle advocates say it will take away two-thirds of their funding setting the plan back five years. >> three women who dined at a stockton card room saying the bill they received was outrageous not because of the price. christina and two friends are mad about a remark typed on
. if the politicians in washington negotiate a bad deal on the budget and deficit, what do you think will happen to medicare and medicaid benefits? and to our coverage? cutting hundreds of billions of dollars from medicare and medicaid will short change the people who need it the most. so if you don't want seniors to come up empty. call sen. warner and tell him don't make a bad deal that cuts our care. snairlts 16 days until christmas now but who is counting. 'tis the season for gifts particularly gifts with an affordable price tag. david pogue of the "new york times" comes in, appropriately disguised. >> reporter: you think you get stressed when you get on a flight? try my job to fly the whole world in one night. rein deer with rain ease and scrapes on the sleigh and that hurricane blue me away. but i do it, you know, for all it's for a good cause, to spread joy and gadgets that's me, techno-claus. now this year some folks are in financial jams so everything here is below 100 clams. the tablet, the i-pad, they're all of the rage. for your music, your books. it's a digital stage. but the speaker
that's out there and that wouldn't make up for our deficit. >> no, but the president's plan of raising taxes on the rich, let's assume even he has his way. let's assume republicans go along with his plan. that at best raises about $70 billion a year. that leaves us with a trillion dollar deficit. this puts the president i think in a little bit of a hole. if the republicans give his way, what's plan "b"? what do we do next to deal with the deficit? the president and tim geithner basically this weekend said we've got plans to cut entitlements by 400 bill or ion 500 billion dollars. that's over ten years. we have a much bigger hole than i think anyone in washington is willing to agree is such a problem. >> lrepublicans are angry the president laid out this plan that they say he knew would just inflame them. >> that's true. >> why toedon't republicans act like big boys and girls and present their own plan about how they specifically want to cut entitlements? isn't that how you negotiate? >> yes, but, of course, they've done that. that's the most curious thing to me. tim geithner said the r
with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is foundation. and we have i think the united states, both an opportunity to require it to get our house in order, and i believe that our 100 senators and members of the house will step up on this and sufficient majority in the coming months. >> how do you look at your surplus of the u.s.? does that say we have america under our control? >> we are one of the closest allies of the united states. so of course our position today to united states is very, very decisive, strengthen our relationship. so these are not, there is no intention for us to try to use this kind of economic relationship in different context. so we are very satisfied with the current relationship with the united states. that's all spent let me open up to the fl
deficit just by raising money from rich people. >> let's talk netflix. receiving wells notice from s.e.c., regulators warning they may bring civil action against the company and the ceo for violating public disclosure rules with a facebook post. back on july 3rd, the ceo posting netflix a monthly viewing exceeded 1 billion hours for the first time ever in june. the s.e.c. requires public companies to make the information public. hastings says he didn't believe the facebook post was material information although that day the stock was up 13%. in a letter yesterday, he also suggested the fact the post was assessable to more than 245,000 subscribers to the page makes it very public. you can choose to disclose information through other venues considered fair that may reach fewer people at the end of the day. >> ain't up to you. it's up to the government. >> rules are rules. >> and these things do need to evolve. there is little doubt about that. i remember when fd was put in. i would have conversations with executives and say you can tell me -- i'm on cnbc -- i will make it public. i'm n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)